Susquehanna River Basin Commission
Real-Time Data and Maps Data Reports Overview Objectives SRBC Home
Installation

Monitoring Parameters

Water Temperature

Water temperature is very important to fish and other aquatic life, as well as for swimmers, fishermen, and industries. Temperature affects the ability of water to hold oxygen, which can affect respiration and an organism's ability to resist certain pollutants. Human induced changes to water temperatures can have a great effect on stream ecosystems. The loss of riparian tree cover can raise stream temperatures through exposure to the sun. In addition, a lot of water in the Susquehanna Watershed is used for cooling purposes in power plants that generate electricity, resulting in warmer water releases back to the environment. The temperature of the released water can affect downstream habitats.

back to top

pH

pH is a measure of water's acidity/basicity. The range goes from 0 - 14, with 7 being neutral. A pH of less than 7 indicates acidity, whereas a pH of greater than 7 indicates basicity. pH is really a measure of the relative amount of free hydrogen and hydroxyl ions in the water. Water that has more free hydrogen ions is acidic, whereas water that has more free hydroxyl ions is basic. Since pH can be affected by chemicals in the water, pH is an important indicator of water that is changing chemically. pH is reported in "logarithmic units," like the Richter scale which measures earthquakes. Each number represents a 10-fold change in the acidity/basicity of the water. Water with a pH of 5 is ten times more acidic than water having a pH of six.

Pollution can change a stream's pH, which in turn can harm animals and plants living in the water. For instance, water coming out of an abandoned coal mine can have a pH of 2, which is very acidic and would definitely affect any fish's health. By using the logarithm scale, this mine-drainage water would be 100,000 times more acidic than neutral water -- so stay out of abandoned mines.

back to top

Specific Conductance

Specific conductance is a measure of the ability of water to conduct an electrical current. It is highly dependent on the amount of dissolved solids (such as salt) in the water. Pure water, such as distilled water, will have a very low specific conductance, and sea water will have a high specific conductance. Rainwater often dissolves airborne gasses and airborne dust while it is in the air, and thus often has a higher specific conductance than distilled water. Specific conductance is an important water-quality measurement because it gives a good idea of the amount of dissolved material in the water.

High specific conductance indicates high dissolved-solids concentration; dissolved solids can affect aquatic life, as well as the suitability of water for domestic, industrial, and agricultural uses. At higher levels, drinking water may have an unpleasant taste or odor or may even cause gastrointestinal distress. Additionally, high dissolved-solids concentration can cause deterioration of plumbing fixtures and appliances. Relatively expensive water-treatment processes, such as reverse osmosis, are needed to remove excessive dissolved solids from water.

back to top

Dissolved Oxygen

 The oxygen dissolved in lakes, rivers, and oceans is crucial for the organisms and creatures living in it. As the amount of dissolved oxygen drops below normal levels in water bodies, the water quality is harmed and creatures begin to die off. Indeed, a water body can "die", a process called eutrophication.

A small amount of oxygen, up to about ten molecules of oxygen per million of water, is actually dissolved in water. This dissolved oxygen is breathed by fish and zooplankton and is needed by them to survive.

Rapidly moving water, such as in a mountain stream or large river, tends to contain a lot of dissolved oxygen, while stagnant water contains little. Bacteria in water can consume oxygen as organic matter decays. Thus, excess organic material in our lakes and rivers can cause an oxygen-deficient situation to occur. Aquatic life can have a hard time in stagnant water that has a lot of rotting, organic material in it, especially in summer, when dissolved-oxygen levels are at a seasonal low.

back to top

Turbidity

Turbidity is the amount of particulate matter that is suspended in water. Turbidity monitors measure the scattering effect that suspended solids have on light: the higher the intensity of scattered light, the higher the turbidity. Material that causes water to be turbid includes:

Turbidity makes the water cloudy or opaque, and is reported in nephelometric turbidity units (NTU). During periods of low flow (base flow), many rivers are a clear green color, and turbidities are low, usually less than 10 NTU. During a rainstorm, particles from the surrounding land are washed into the river making the water a muddy brown color, indicating water that has higher turbidity values. Also, during high flows, water velocities are faster and water volumes are higher, which can more easily stir up and suspend material from the stream bed, causing higher turbidities.

The picture with the three glass vials shows turbidity standards of 5, 50, and 500 NTUs. Once the meter is calibrated to correctly read these standards, the turbidity of a water sample can be taken.

Lab Glassware Image

Turbidity can be measured in the laboratory and also on-site in the river. A handheld turbidity meter (left-side picture) measures turbidity of a water sample. The meter is calibrated using standard samples from the meter manufacturer. The picture with the three glass vials shows turbidity standards of 5, 50, and 500 NTUs. Once the meter is calibrated to correctly read these standards, the turbidity of a water sample can be taken.

Turbidity Meter Image

State-of-the-art turbidity meters (left-side picture) are beginning to be installed in rivers to provide an instantaneous turbidity reading. The right-side picture shows a closeup of the meter. The large tube is the turbidity sensor; it reads turbidity in the river by shining a light into the water and reading how much light is reflected back to the sensor. The smaller tube contains a conductivity sensor to measure electrical conductance of the water, which is strongly influenced by dissolved solids (the two holes) and a temperature gauge (the metal rod).

 

Susquehanna River Basin Commission
4423 North Front Street, Harrisburg, PA 17110
phone (717) 238-0423 fax (717) 238-2436
email srbc@srbc.net

Platform Image

Data platform (above); data sonde and protective casing (below)

Casing Image

***During the winter season, data transmission schedules to the web site may be reduced for select stations to conserve power, since the stations are powered by solar panels which can be affected by snow/ice conditions and shorter daylight hours. In addition, water quality observations may be affected at times by ice buildup and/or blockages.